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New Study Shows Music Events Benefit Happiness and Personal Well-Being

Photo by Cameron Frazier

A new study found that dancing and attending music events regularly improves happiness and benefits personal well-being. This may be something we already know (who doesn’t understand the bliss of watching your favorite DJ at an awesome venue?) but now, there is scholarly evidence to back it up.

Researchers Melissa K. Weinberg and Dawn Joseph of Deakin University, Australia conducted a study titled “If you’re happy and you know it: Music engagement and subjective wellbeing.”

The basis of the study

The study surveyed 1,000 participants to connect music engagement to personal well-being and life satisfaction. Participants rated areas of life satisfaction on a scale of 0-10 in eight different categories. These categories related to overall standard of living, health, achievement, relationships, safety, community, connection, and future security.

The scores in each category were averaged to produce a total well-being score. Then, participants responded to a series of yes/no questions that reported their engagement with music.

Results show the total personal well-being [PWI] score is “significantly higher” for people who dance and attend music events in contrast to those who do not. Although there isn’t a significant difference in general life satisfaction between the two categories, people who dance and attend music events “reported higher scores on four of the PWI domains [than those who did not dance]: satisfaction with health, achieving in life, relationships, and community connection.” [pullquote align=”right”]”The insight gained from these findings can be used to inform future interventions and to better understand how music is involved in emotional regulation.”[/pullquote]

The report continues, citing how “the findings also emphasized the important role of engaging with music in the company of others with regard to [subjective wellbeing], highlighting an interpersonal feature of music.” Several studies (Mas-Herrero, Marco-Pallares, Lorenzo-Seva, Zatorre, & Rodriguez-Fornells, 2013; Morinville, Miranda, & Gaudreau, 2013) show music as one of the most enjoyable activities, plus include several benefits on well-being. Weinberg and Joseph want to continue to make connections between music and emotional health.

Now, there is scholarly data to vouch for the amount of money we spend on festivals and concerts, meaning, it’s time to grab your friends for your next musical adventure. And who says money can’t buy happiness?

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