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Cell Phones At Shows Are Here to Stay, But Should They Be?

It seems that the idea of “pics or it didn’t happen” is more real than ever, but there is also no denying that standing behind a sea of cell phones while you are trying to watch a live event is annoying and frustrating. You go to a show to experience the music, and half the time you are trying to maneuver around little screens.

A recent survey given to 1031 British adults by Eventbrite found some interesting findings when it comes to cell phone use. The survey asked adults that had gone to a live event in the last year a number of questions about cell phone use, and the finds are bit contradictory to what we experience.

  • 70% find it annoying when others are taking pictures and/or videos.
  • 81% understood why an artist would find it annoying if attendees videotaped or photographed a live event
  • 1/3 said filming and photographing was an important part of the live experience
  • 49% said they took photos and videos at the events they attended

So why does this behavior continue? Because people are selfish. We are okay if we do the filming, but then get annoyed when others are doing the same thing.

So what do we do? According to the study, “69 percent fell strongly about supporting measures that might limit mobile phone usage at live events,” but no measure could be used for all live events. Having the same rules for a comedy show as a DJ set is ridiculous. Of course you should not be taping the comedian. That is just common sense.

But filming a song being played by your favorite DJ is way less invasive. We understand that it is hard to get the vibe of the crowd without being able to see the audience, but nowadays talent travels through social media.

Do certain steps need to be taken? Yes, common sense and basic human decency. People need to realize that the experience of the night can be affected by their actions. Be aware of your surroundings. Be a good human being.

Clubs and DJs could specifically make harsher rules to cell phone use, but do we need to take our time trying to come up with a measure that would have to be different for every experience, no.

The problem comes down to the attendees realizing that the night is not all about their experience and enjoying the night in the present. Let us know what you think on our Facebook or Twitter!